5/14/20: THE YELLOW LIGHT DISTRICT – POD PEOPLE OF THE FUTURE

MONOLOGUE WRITTEN BY CLYDE LEWIS

A month or so ago we did a show on the possibility that perhaps we have somehow passed into a different dimension and that this would explain why things are so out of sorts. In the Ground Zero show, Plaguing by the Book, we cited that authors like Dean Koontz were writing about a corona virus called Wuhan 400 dating back 40 years.

Now it has been discovered that a depiction of life in 2022 by an Italian magazine first published in 1962 depicted pedestrians using motorized pods instead of walking, something that may turn out to be quite accurate given current fears over coronavirus.

The image was drawn by Walter Molino, an Italian comic’s artist and illustrator. It featured on the front page of a 1962 edition of La Domenica del Corriere, an Italian weekly newspaper which ran from 1899 to 1989.

The picture shows people dressed in 1960’s attire riding around on scooters with domes on them. They are navigating out of their own personal germ free pod.

While the depiction was probably more of a pedestrian travel-related prediction, it meshes quite eerily with current fears over coronavirus, which has led to suggestions that the “new normal” must incorporate a similar pod-based lifestyle to protect against the virus.

We hope it doesn’t lead to what we see in the picture but it again makes you wonder about time lines and the uncanny way we are seeing the present affecting the past and the future affecting the present.

This of course is retro causality.

It is a quantum thing where it appears that some event that changes your life happens before the cause.

If you were to break your arm tomorrow afternoon, would you suddenly find it hanging useless in a sling this morning? Of course not – the question makes no sense. Cause always precedes effect. But maybe life isn’t quite so straightforward for a photon. In the subatomic realm, where the laws of quantum physics make seemingly impossible feats routine, the one thing that we always considered beyond the pale might just be true.

This idea that the future can influence the present, and that the present can influence the past, is known as retrocausality. It has been around for a while without ever catching on and for good reason, because we never see effects happen before their causes in everyday life. But now, a fresh twist on a deep tension in the foundations of quantum theory suggests that we may have no choice but to think again.

For example many people are familiar with Stephen King’s, Book The Dead Zone.

In the film the main character discovers that he has the psychic ability to learn aspects of a person’s life through physical contact with them. He sees their future or what might be a future event in their life.

So in order to prevent a retro causal paradox he warns people of what is going to happen.

One day the main character Johnny attends a rally for Greg Stillson, a superficially charismatic third-party candidate for the United States Senate. Johnny shakes Stillson’s hand and has a vision of him becoming president and ordering a preemptive nuclear strike against the Soviet Union that results in a nuclear holocaust.

Stephen King aat down for an interview where he was asked about how some fans thinlk that Stillson reminds them of Donald Trump.

King admits that he even sees Stillson’s character as mirroring Trump and that he wanted to create a candidate that would be the country’s worst nightmare. While it is arguable that Trump is someone’s worst nightmare he certainly takes rent n a lot people’s heads as everything is politically charged.

King comparing Stillson Trump is only part of this equation. The way retro causality works is very peculiar – the main character Johnny uses possible futures as a way to alter the present.

In The Dead Zone TV show that aired in 2003, one of the episodes of the show which is titled as Plague, Johnny Smith has a vision. The retired school teacher has a vision that a group of children are becoming sick after they are infected with a mysterious virus. He then confronts the town sheriff and tells him what he saw in his vision. He also advises the sheriff to quarantine the building as the students begin to get sick.

The episode also predicts the chain of events that followed after the Coronavirus pandemic. While finding out about the origin of the virus, the local health inspector talks about the possibility of the virus originating in China and those who have recently travelled there could be the cause of its outbreak. The episode also talks about how CDC, US-based Centers for Disease Control might take months to figure out a cure of the virus or where it originated from.

The episode is an uncanny version of what is happening now – as if it were planned. As if the future has somehow influenced the past.

There was also a Simpson’s episode that aired that also seemed to be an uncanny predictor of the future. “The Episode Marge in Chains” there is a segment where the people are rioting for a cure for a disease in front of a Doctor’s house, the doctor recommends bed rest because if he gave them anything to take it would be a placebo. Someone screams “Where do we get the placebos” and some guy in the crowd find a truck that he thinks has the cure. Instead there is a box of killer bees inside.

Many people have compared the episode sequence to the time we are in now and the possibility of being attacked by Murder hornets.

This just adds to the quantum mystery of ideas before their time – or prophetic glimpses into the future through retro causality.

Time Travel has been a great deus Ex machine for science fiction writers, but if the theorists going back to the future with retrocausality can make it stick, the implications would be almost as mind-boggling. They could not only explain the randomness seemingly inherent to the quantum world, but even remake it in a way that finally brings it into line with Einstein’s ideas of space and time – an achievement that has eluded physicists for decades.

I want to address the simple concept of randomness and how it effects all moments in time. Then we are going to experiment with present affecting past –and future affecting present.

Although there are many counterintuitive ideas in quantum theory, the idea that influences can travel backwards in time from the future to the past is generally not one of them. However, when you propose that influences of the future can somehow effect the present we get into some areas that people have a hard time processes.

It is like how to explain to someone that the bad Tuna Salad they ate on Friday is actually the reason their stomach is aching on Tuesday.

I remember saying on the air that the Impossible Burger is a retro causal product. It arrived because of a meat shortage we were going to have in the future. We really did not have a need for the impossible meat substitute when it first showed up – so in a quantum conundrum we wonder if a meat shortage in the future, influenced the making of a meat substitute when we did not need one.

Someone could argue that the reason why Impossible meat was invented and sold before the meat shortage was because it was just a meat alternative—but those who created it made it as close to beef as possible and it was almost as if it was created because there was going to be no meat at all in the future or that for some odd reason there would be a shortage of meat protein.

Now there is no way to presume a causal reversal but this is certainly an event before the cause.

We all know quantum mechanics is weird. And part of that weirdness comes down to the fact that at a fundamental level, particles don’t act like solid billiard balls rolling down a table, but rather like a blurry cloud of possibilities shifting around the room.

This blurry cloud comes into sharp focus when we try to measure particles, meaning we can only ever see a white ball hitting a black one into the corner pocket, and never countless white balls hitting black balls into every pocket.

There is an argument among physicists over whether that cloud of maybes represents something real, or if it’s just a convenient representation.

In the realm of fringe analytics, there are a whole lot of maybes and coincidences that should never be ignored – even when they sound outrageous.

Scientists can’t be sure what the shape of space-time is, but most likely, it’s flat (as opposed to spherical or even donut-shape) and stretches out infinitely. But if space-time goes on forever, then it must start repeating at some point, because there are a finite number of ways particles can be arranged in space and time.

So if you look far enough, you would encounter another version of you in fact, infinite versions of you. But what about different versions of history or things that keep repeating over time where a pattern of both the Mandela Effect and De ja vu play into meaningful synchronicity.

Take for example, COVID-19.

We are being told that COVID-19 has upended our lives and it may just throw us into what is called the new normal.

No matter how much we try to say that we should never see it as a new normal there are many people among us that act as if all of the new draconian measures will be permanent and that we must follow them now or die.

The reason people are acting this way is because of projection—meaning that most of what we are being told is based on future statistical data calculated for a worst case scenario.

In other words they project the worst for the future –which is affecting the present because people are reacting to a scenario (hundreds of thousands more dead) that hasn’t happened yet.

The present is being punished for a possible future.

The present facts are less scary that the retro causality the technocrats are causing.

For example the odds of an average person catching the diseases and being hospitalized are 40.4 per 100,000 (but 131.6 for those 65 or older comparable for hospitalization rates for the seasonal flu). Moreover, many infected display no symptoms or recover at home so they are statistically invisible so the true infection rate of 40.4 per 100,000 is likely too high.

Let that sink in – the reaction that people are having now is what should be had for a disease with higher odds of contraction – this has not arrived yet. But if retro causality is any indication something bigger is coming, where the reactions now will be a quantum I told you so for a disease that acts like Schrodinger’s cat.

Now I have just shown you how the future affects the present.

Now when we take a trip to the past in order to understand the present it becomes trickier because the younger members of the population do not care about their past but those who are older know and so they are acting differently because of it.

Let’s begin by noting that past carnage per se does not entirely explain the panic in the present. We can claim that this is a Mandela Effect but it stretches the topic to credulity– but there has been far more crazy things we do not remember.

The super-deadly 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic is well-known because the media is using that incident to affect the present—but as I reported that there have been flu pandemics that have happened in more recent eras that have been buried to influence our present reactions.

For relevancy to what I am talking about we can go back in time to 1968 and the Hong King Flu.

Though largely forgotten, in 1968, the H3N2 (its technical name) pandemic killed 100,000 Americans (plus a million more worldwide), a figure that exceeds the death toll of both the Vietnam and Korean Wars. Moreover, the US population in 1970 was 209 million versus 330 million today, so adjusted for population the number killed was 136,000.

For unclear reasons, however, the 1968 “Hong Kong” flu passed almost unnoticed when it hit, conceivably over-shadowed by the Vietnam War and widespread urban rioting. Closer in time was the epidemic of 1957 that killed 116,000 and the 2009 flu epidemic—H1N1—affected 60.8 million Americans and the estimated death toll was around 12,000.

And this happened in the lifetimes of every American over 52 years of age. 

There were no shutdowns or economical maneuvers or reasons to make things political. There was no panic and no required mask wearing or social distancing.

Nothing was closed by force. Schools mostly stayed open. Businesses did too. You could go to the movies. You could go to bars and restaurants.

 In fact, people have no memory or awareness that during the famous Woodstock concert of August 1969 was planned in January during the worse period of death – actually occurred during a deadly American flu pandemic that only peaked globally six months later. There was no thought given to the virus which, like ours today, was dangerous mainly for a non-concert-going demographic.

So what has changed?

The distinction between controllable versus almost random lethality helps explains why highlighting overall US morality statistics fails to calm the panic. 

The framing of COVID-19 as a lethal killer is a projection for what may come or what is being planned. The deaths associated with COVID-19 are not guaranteed and apparently are not controllable even if you are social distancing or wearing a mask.

In fact, last April, Doctor Anthony Fauci appeared on 60 Minutes to talk about what people need to do to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

One of the things he addressed was mask wearing and why you should not wear one.

“There’s no reason to be walking around with a mask,” infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci told 60 Minutes.

While masks may block some droplets, Fauci said, they do not provide the level of protection people think they do. Wearing a mask may also have unintended consequences: People who wear masks tend to touch their face more often to adjust them, which can spread germs from their hands.

So if Fauci said this then why are the people not adhering to science?

Something has changed the past.

Not only that the Surgeon General agreed with Doctor Fauci but doubled down on the idea.

Back in March Surgeon General Jerome Adams said that wearing a mask would be a hazard to one’s health.

Then he changed his mind and said that they curtail spread. Again what has changed the past?

The argument is that they didn’t want people to hoard the N-95 masks – but there are a lot of things that point to retro causality and the tinkering on display that warrants control.

Now pay attention to what happened yesterday.

The World Health Organization held a media briefing on May 13th to update the public on the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

The World Health Organization stated that “Lockdowns” are no longer a one size fits all cure for COVID-19 spread.

There is no universal definition for what constitutes a lockdown.

Lockdowns, explained Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, WHO Technical Lead, are a set of measures countries have taken that include individual- and community-level restrictions of movement. They can include full- or partial closures of different types of facilities, such as schools or workplaces.

“I think there’s this misconception that a lockdown is one thing…it’s not,” Van Kerkhove said.

Not all countries have needed to close all types of facilities, she added. Some countries have been able to control the virus and still leave workplaces open, or even bars and nightclubs.

“The word ‘lockdown’ makes it sound like an entire country has shut down overnight,” she said. “And it’s just not the case. It isn’t an all or nothing.”

“Michael J. Ryan, Chief Executive Director of the WHO Health Emergencies Program said the following:

“There’s some magical thinking going on…that lockdowns work perfectly and that unlocking lockdowns will go great.”

Magical thinking can also fit into the quantum nature of how we are seeing a overlapping of one story as opposed to another story and how people in the middle of an a causal situation are overreacting because of something that has not arrived yet .

That is a virus that when contracted is terminal because COVID-19 is not terminal – its lethality is just as random as any other disease.

COVID-19 we are told is different , unique and lethal and as public health officials insist, it can be mitigated by avoiding crowds, frequent hand washing and wearing masks.

But, can such personal actions hardly guarantee that you won’t catch it given the iffy underlying science. For example, as one recent report from New York City found that two-thirds of those admitted to hospitals were, as per official decree, self-quarantined by staying home. Only a small percentage worked away from home and a tiny number took public transportation, In other words, the official wisdom may have been inaccurate, so who can be trusted?

 Especially troublesome is how high anxiety levels undermine rational cost-benefit public debate. It is easy to understand why those suffering from quarantine fatigue are confused by often uncertain epidemical CDC data. Statistics about the extremely low odds of infection for those under 65 and in decent health are meaningless to habitual lottery players.

Terror may be especially likely for those who think that when you die you will wind up being an anonymous corpse rotting in a refrigerated truck in a Queens New York parking lot.

Those who are pitching tracing apps are also in the way of creating a bit of retro causality, because again there is a product that seems to have come from out of nowhere that is supposed to be a solution for something with random lethality.

In fact, it can be said that tracing apps are going to become the first ever technological snake oil to ever be sold in history. Unfortunately for all who’ve pinned their hopes on this particular technological fix, even if the scores of different apps released into the wild or in the development pipeline work as promised — and that’s a big if — it’s unclear if contact-tracing apps will ever be anything more than a supplement to a national, human-run, contact-tracing program. A program we do not currently have. 

Contact-tracing apps, unlike tried and true human-driven contact tracing, are a new and untested idea. And many of the real-world cases we have seen, unfortunately, failed to live up to the hype. What’s more, early examples present troubling questions about privacy, security, and potential abuse – questions that remain unanswered.

It’s no wonder, then, that actual experts in the field aren’t exactly singing the tech’s praises. 

Again unless something bad in the future is coming there is no need for these gadgets and so we ask is this another product made in the present that is affected by the future?

All things we see and perceive are electric stimulus and light that transmits information that we can pay attention to, and then, of course, there are these details that we don’t. They are later pointed out to us as a reminder that perhaps there is a Revelation of the Method but then we reconsider because what is happening may be more than predictive programming – it may be various echoes that we puck up in transit.

The question is: if we are in transit then where are we going to end up and why are we seeing these echoes of reverse causality?

Very few average people have the discipline to check their views and beliefs with the criteria of consistency. The average person when listening to a proposed authority needs to also internally decide if any claim that has been made provides verifiable documentation to your satisfaction. Do all of the pieces of information provided fit the dialogue and timeline provided?

If there is an extreme break with reality and the world view, there is always the consensus opinion that the mental health of the person is under suspicion. However, there has never been a consensus opinion that the breakdown of reality is happening and that people now are not exactly privy to harsh realities that are creating that blind spot in time and that selective reality that seems to be a refuge for the person in denial.

We are seeing reality break down because the masters know how to manipulate time, rewrite reality and change world view and it is being done because we are giving consent to them by moving in a direction they are wanting us to move in while under the influence of trauma.

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